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Passports and Brexit: What you will need to travel after UK leaves the EU – The Independent - http://travelporn.info | luxury travel sites

March 8, 2019 7:31 am Categorised in:

The travel industry is aghast at the lack of certainty about the rules that will apply after 29 March 2019.

The default is a no-deal Brexit, which means that passport regulations will change drastically for trips from 30 March onwards. 

Unfortunately, the government’s information tells only half the story – and misleading media reports have confused the issue still further.

Your passport is valid for travel anywhere in the European Union up to and including the date of expiry. Widespread reports that “visitors usually need at least six months left on their passport from the date they arrive” are plain wrong.

1/14 Passports

British passports that expire after 29 March 2019 will continue to be valid as UK travel documents, but will lose the power that comes with being a European Union passport – notably the right of free movement within the EU27. UK passports issued from 30 March 2019 will have the words “European Union” removed from the cover and the first page (along with the translations into Welsh and Gaelic). But they will still be burgundy. By October 2019, new British passports will have dark blue covers

Getty

2/14 Pets

You will still be able to travel to the EU with your pet after Brexit, but it could well get more complicated depending on the status that the European Union decide to apply. If the UK is given “Part 2 listed status”, there would be some extra requirements for travelling pets and owners post-Brexit. “These would require an additional visit to the vet and some additional papers to be carried but would not prevent you from enjoying your trip,” says Eurotunnel. But it adds that if the UK is given unlisted, third-country status, “owners who wish to travel with their pets from the UK to EU nations will need to discuss their specific preparations and requirements with an Official Veterinarian at least four months prior to their desired travel date

AFP/Getty

3/14 Eurotunnel/Eurostar

The Treaty of Canterbury between the UK and France governs the Channel Tunnel link and operations will continue – subject to any local disruption at Folkestone and/or Calais

AFP/Getty

4/14 Driving

Motorists, whether taking their own cars or hiring abroad, are likely to need to obtain an International Driving Permit or two; different EU countries are signed up to different treaties, so for a trip embracing Spain and France you would need both types. These are currently sold from a limited number of Post Offices, but the government intends to make them widely available. The cost is £5.50 for each. Motor insurance will no longer automatically extend to the EU. Insurers will provide on request a “Green Card”, for which an extra charge will be made

PA

5/14 Flights

Even in the event of a no-deal Brexit, flights will continue to operate between the UK and European Union. However, in the event of the UK leaving with no deal, many flights are likely to be cancelled because departures would be capped at 2018 levels. As UK airlines have already announced thousands of new flights to Europe from the end of March 2019, some would have to be cancelled

Getty

6/14 Air routes

The network of flight links between Britain and eastern Europe could be affected by any reduction in the number of workers from those countries. Not only do they use the flights – so do their families and friends

PA

7/14 Flight disruption rights

Current European passengers’ rights rules, known as EC261/2004, stipulate high payouts for delays and cancellations that cannot be attributed to “extraordinary circumstances”. Buried in a document called Beyond the Horizon: The Future of UK Aviation, the government says “the UK will not fall below current standards of protection when we leave the EU”

AFP/Getty

8/14 Entry regulations to the European Union

From 11pm GMT on 29 March 2019, UK travellers will become “third-country nationals” when travelling to Schengen countries and subject to the standard rules of admission for citizens of nations such as the US, Japan and Australia. That means there must be at least 90 days (roughly three months) left on your passport beyond your intended date of departure. Because third-country nationals can remain in the Schengen area for 90 days, the actual check carried out could be that the passport has at least six months’ validity remaining on the date of arrival

Getty

9/14 Online registration prior to travel – ETIAS

From 2021, non-EU nationals who do not require a visa to enter the Schengen area – including British travellers – will need to request prior authorisation to visit Schengen countries. The Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) is aimed at reducing the “migration, security or public-health risk” from nationals of visa-exempt third countries, which is what the UK will become after Brexit. It costs €7 for three years

AFP/Getty

10/14 ‘Brexit clauses’

A large number of travel providers – even including National Express coaches – have added “Brexit clauses” to their terms and conditions. These generally specify that they will not be liable for “consequential losses” as a result of Brexit-related issues

PA

11/14 ‘Fast track’ lanes for passport control entering EU countries

British passport holders will not be able to use them, and must join the queue for third-country nationals. People holding an EU passport or ID card as well as a British passport will be able to exit the UK on the British passport but enter Europe on the EU document

Getty

12/14 Ferries

The ferry industry insists vessels will continue to sail. The UK Chamber of Shipping says: “Unlike the carriage of cargo, trade deals do not have a significant effect on the cruise and passenger ferry industry. The explicit standardisation of commodity codes and tariffs associated with trade deals have little relevance to holidaymakers.” Having said that, the government and Kent County Council are planning for possible chaos at Channel ports because of a backlog of trucks in the event of a no-deal Brexit. This would impinge on holidaymakers’ plans

PA

13/14 European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)

The EU says: “If you fall ill or have an accident during a visit to another EU country, as an EU citizen you have the right to receive the necessary public healthcare in any EU country under the same conditions as people in the host country.” The EHIC also works in Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Treatment, says the NHS, is “at a reduced cost or, in many cases, free of charge”. From 11pm GMT on 29 March 2019, when the UK ceases to belong to the European Union, British travellers will have no automatic right to use the EHIC. There is no certainty about what may replace it

PA

14/14 Mobile phones

From 30 March 2019, the law banning mobile phone firms from charging extra for calls and data in Europe will cease, though operators have yet to set out exactly what will replace it. In theory, mobile phone firms can impose whatever fees they think the market will bear. But Dave Dyson, chef executive of Three, says his firm is “committed to maintain the availability of roaming in the EU at no additional cost following Brexit”

AFP/Getty

1/14 Passports

British passports that expire after 29 March 2019 will continue to be valid as UK travel documents, but will lose the power that comes with being a European Union passport – notably the right of free movement within the EU27. UK passports issued from 30 March 2019 will have the words “European Union” removed from the cover and the first page (along with the translations into Welsh and Gaelic). But they will still be burgundy. By October 2019, new British passports will have dark blue covers

Getty

2/14 Pets

You will still be able to travel to the EU with your pet after Brexit, but it could well get more complicated depending on the status that the European Union decide to apply. If the UK is given “Part 2 listed status”, there would be some extra requirements for travelling pets and owners post-Brexit. “These would require an additional visit to the vet and some additional papers to be carried but would not prevent you from enjoying your trip,” says Eurotunnel. But it adds that if the UK is given unlisted, third-country status, “owners who wish to travel with their pets from the UK to EU nations will need to discuss their specific preparations and requirements with an Official Veterinarian at least four months prior to their desired travel date

AFP/Getty

3/14 Eurotunnel/Eurostar

The Treaty of Canterbury between the UK and France governs the Channel Tunnel link and operations will continue – subject to any local disruption at Folkestone and/or Calais

AFP/Getty

4/14 Driving

Motorists, whether taking their own cars or hiring abroad, are likely to need to obtain an International Driving Permit or two; different EU countries are signed up to different treaties, so for a trip embracing Spain and France you would need both types. These are currently sold from a limited number of Post Offices, but the government intends to make them widely available. The cost is £5.50 for each. Motor insurance will no longer automatically extend to the EU. Insurers will provide on request a “Green Card”, for which an extra charge will be made

PA

5/14 Flights

Even in the event of a no-deal Brexit, flights will continue to operate between the UK and European Union. However, in the event of the UK leaving with no deal, many flights are likely to be cancelled because departures would be capped at 2018 levels. As UK airlines have already announced thousands of new flights to Europe from the end of March 2019, some would have to be cancelled

Getty

6/14 Air routes

The network of flight links between Britain and eastern Europe could be affected by any reduction in the number of workers from those countries. Not only do they use the flights – so do their families and friends

PA

7/14 Flight disruption rights

Current European passengers’ rights rules, known as EC261/2004, stipulate high payouts for delays and cancellations that cannot be attributed to “extraordinary circumstances”. Buried in a document called Beyond the Horizon: The Future of UK Aviation, the government says “the UK will not fall below current standards of protection when we leave the EU”

AFP/Getty

8/14 Entry regulations to the European Union

From 11pm GMT on 29 March 2019, UK travellers will become “third-country nationals” when travelling to Schengen countries and subject to the standard rules of admission for citizens of nations such as the US, Japan and Australia. That means there must be at least 90 days (roughly three months) left on your passport beyond your intended date of departure. Because third-country nationals can remain in the Schengen area for 90 days, the actual check carried out could be that the passport has at least six months’ validity remaining on the date of arrival

Getty

9/14 Online registration prior to travel – ETIAS

From 2021, non-EU nationals who do not require a visa to enter the Schengen area – including British travellers – will need to request prior authorisation to visit Schengen countries. The Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) is aimed at reducing the “migration, security or public-health risk” from nationals of visa-exempt third countries, which is what the UK will become after Brexit. It costs €7 for three years

AFP/Getty

10/14 ‘Brexit clauses’

A large number of travel providers – even including National Express coaches – have added “Brexit clauses” to their terms and conditions. These generally specify that they will not be liable for “consequential losses” as a result of Brexit-related issues

PA

11/14 ‘Fast track’ lanes for passport control entering EU countries

British passport holders will not be able to use them, and must join the queue for third-country nationals. People holding an EU passport or ID card as well as a British passport will be able to exit the UK on the British passport but enter Europe on the EU document

Getty

12/14 Ferries

The ferry industry insists vessels will continue to sail. The UK Chamber of Shipping says: “Unlike the carriage of cargo, trade deals do not have a significant effect on the cruise and passenger ferry industry. The explicit standardisation of commodity codes and tariffs associated with trade deals have little relevance to holidaymakers.” Having said that, the government and Kent County Council are planning for possible chaos at Channel ports because of a backlog of trucks in the event of a no-deal Brexit. This would impinge on holidaymakers’ plans

PA

13/14 European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)

The EU says: “If you fall ill or have an accident during a visit to another EU country, as an EU citizen you have the right to receive the necessary public healthcare in any EU country under the same conditions as people in the host country.” The EHIC also works in Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Treatment, says the NHS, is “at a reduced cost or, in many cases, free of charge”. From 11pm GMT on 29 March 2019, when the UK ceases to belong to the European Union, British travellers will have no automatic right to use the EHIC. There is no certainty about what may replace it

PA

14/14 Mobile phones

From 30 March 2019, the law banning mobile phone firms from charging extra for calls and data in Europe will cease, though operators have yet to set out exactly what will replace it. In theory, mobile phone firms can impose whatever fees they think the market will bear. But Dave Dyson, chef executive of Three, says his firm is “committed to maintain the availability of roaming in the EU at no additional cost following Brexit”

AFP/Getty

This will continue to apply up to 11pm UK time (midnight in most western European countries) on 29 March.

Nothing changes for travel to the Republic of Ireland, which is governed by a Common Travel Area agreement that transcends EU law. Passports are not required, though some airlines specify that they must be produced for identification.

But the UK government is warning that travellers to the Schengen Area (which covers all other EU countries except Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Cyprus) will need six months’ validity in their passports.

Unfortunately, once the UK leaves the European Union, British passport holders become subject to the EU rules for third-country nationals. Crucially, no passport is regarded as valid beyond 10 years after the date of issue.

Because for nearly two decades until September 2018, UK adult passport holders who were renewing their travel documents were granted up to nine months’ credit for unexpired time. So a passport issued on 29 September 2009 could show an expiry date of 29 June 2020.

But once Britain leaves the EU, it will be regarded by Schengen countries as expiring on 29 September 2019. So someone hoping to travel to one of these nations on 30 March 2019 would be ineligible, according to the UK government – even though their passport shows an expiry date almost 15 months ahead.

Children’s passports were issued for a maximum of five years and nine months and therefore do not conflict with the EU’s 10-year maximum.

Then you will need to decide whether or not to renew. The foregoing applies only in the event of a no-deal Brexit, and so if departure is postponed or the Withdrawal Agreement is passed then your passport will continue to be valid as at present. 

But while there is a chance of the UK crashing out with no deal, then you may wish to renew.

The UK Passport Office says: “It should take three weeks to get your passport.” That is why if you plan to travel on 30 March 2019, you should apply by 8 March 2019. The cost is £75.50 if you apply online or £85 if you fill out a paper form.

You can use the one-week fast track service, and make an appointment for an interview. The Passport Office says the document “will be delivered to your home within a week of your appointment”. It costs £142 for an adult passport or £122 for a child passport. 

For adult renewals only (or name changes if you got married or entered into a civil partnership) you can get a same-day passport using the “premium” service. It costs £177.

While it may well be that one or more European nations decide not to impose a six-month minimum, a bigger problem could be that the airline does not let you on board your flight because it is concerned you will not be allowed in.

Q I am flying from the UK via Amsterdam/Frankfurt/Madrid/Paris/Rome to a destination outside the European Union. Does my passport need to be “Schengen compliant”?

No. Since you will be in “airside” transit the only issue is: do you have a passport valid for your final destination? For the US and many other countries, your passport is valid up to and including expiry date.

 
 

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